Getting a Full Licence – Then and Now

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gmham
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Re: Getting a Full Licence – Then and Now

Post by gmham » 25 Oct 2017, 12:45

1985 leith nautical college in Edinburgh. Vhf and up only at the time. Oh how we welcomed 6mtrs when it arrived ! Probably just as well as 12wpm morse was never going to be personally achieved and well think a good few would have slipped back to 11mtrs had 6mtrs and it's dx not became available?!
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thedeerhunter270
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Re: Getting a Full Licence – Then and Now

Post by thedeerhunter270 » 28 Nov 2017, 18:54

Here are the recently released Ofcom stats on licences:

https://www.whatdotheyknow.com/request/ ... 0Radio.pdf

People aren't making it to the full licence.

Amateur Amateur Club Radio Licence 28/04/14 - 1482
Amateur Amateur Radio Foundation Licence 28/04/14 - 19027
Amateur Amateur Radio Intermediate Licence 28/04/14 - 8013
Amateur Amateur Radio Full Licence 28/04/14 - 53961

Amateur Amateur Club Radio Licence 28/08/17 - 1479
Amateur Amateur Radio Foundation Licence 28/08/17 - 22649
Amateur Amateur Radio Intermediate Licence 28/08/17 - 9739
Amateur Amateur Radio Full Licence 28/08/17 - 52195
Operating in South Northumberland and Weardale.

Checkpointcharlie
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Re: Getting a Full Licence – Then and Now

Post by Checkpointcharlie » 04 Dec 2017, 13:09

Doesn't surprise me the system gives too much away at the first 2 levels....Give people a easy option they will take it simples.
Broad sword calling Danny boy......

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thedeerhunter270
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Re: Getting a Full Licence – Then and Now

Post by thedeerhunter270 » 22 Jul 2018, 10:15

Only 250 Advanced passes in 2017.

In the report I note that Ofcom think the Intermediate is too easy.

The number of those passing RSGB Foundation, Intermediate or Advanced exams are:
2017 - F:1310 I:592 A:250
2016 - F:1438 I:661 A:290
2015 - F:1475 I:632 A:300

https://thersgb.org/publications/commit ... mittee.pdf
Operating in South Northumberland and Weardale.

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Mitch
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Re: Getting a Full Licence – Then and Now

Post by Mitch » 22 Jul 2018, 14:25

I was going to take my advanced a year after the intermediate (did that a year after the foundation) but then I got a job working 60+ hours a week and the urge passed. I didn't have time to study for it plus there was nowhere local to do the course (BIG problem). Now, several years on having bought and sold different radios and pretty much done what I wanted experiment wise I can't honestly see the point in advancing further. What do I get with a full license? More power? Use overseas? TBH I hardly ever go on any frequencies these days, HF is full of PLT, 6m is S5+ of permanent QRM, our local repeater has gone C4FM only (got no digital kit), and 2m simplex is all the folks from 11m so just like CB but with more manners.

If the RSGB want more progression then local courses for advanced are a must imho, without it I won't be bothering. I know you can do online studies but it's not the same and all too easy to give up, if you go on a local course you have to pay so there's more motivation to keep going. As things stand I'm happy enough with a 2e0 callsign, I can do all I need to do (when I can be bothered) else I just use my phone or watch movie streams for entertainment like most other people these days. The radio hobby is dying? Well yeah, there's so much more other stuff to do now thanks mostly to the internet, that's more interesting for most people to spend their valuable spare time on.
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Transwarp
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Re: Getting a Full Licence – Then and Now

Post by Transwarp » 22 Jul 2018, 21:23

Agree with the above post.
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paulears
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Re: Getting a Full Licence – Then and Now

Post by paulears » 23 Jul 2018, 10:22

If something is worth having it takes inconvenience and effort. The least useful qualification I got were the trivial ones where no effort was required, and almost every qualification has been made more user friendly, easier to get and has had the success rate upped, by adjusting where a fail comes. Some exams are not even real exams. My wife is totally non-computer literate. She works for the NHS, and has streams of exams to take - some professional ones to do with her job skills, others to do with policy or fire safety, or other crazy stuff. They get taken on-line and are multiple choice, and I've passed the lot as I did them sat with her. Google being the source of my skills in many cases. I a school recently they were doing a mock exam in Biology. I never did Biology at that level when I was at school - I picked something different. The class were a good bunch and worked silently and properly, taking it seriously. Two hours of this was so dull, I did the paper myself. It took me 20 minutes and they had double that. I then had the mark scheme so marked my paper. Of course this is just one element, but I got a B! This is stupid. A B using general knowledge????

On the radio front - apart from exams being an international requirement, what are they for? Gate keeping. No Government wants ham radio to die, because it serves useful purposes. A small percentage get hooked and might join the forces in the signals divisions, others might go through university using radio of some kind and get into proper research and development, and lastly, it keeps bands open and busy and these can be shut down in times of emergency, and the names and addresses of people who can use radio coms are known. In each major conflict world wide, Governments need access to skilled people, part or completely trained in skills others cannot do. Happens every time.

The basic access part I believe has been softened to keep HF going - HF still has a place in lowish Tec comms, with big distances achievable. The Government have no expense and it's a decent plan. The RSGB here do much of the Governments work for them, because it's our hobby. The number of full licence holders is dropping because privileges to the more basic classes are so similar. NONE of the things I use ham radio for need the full licence I have.

No point us old ones getting miffed. This isn't new at all - just evolution. The worst thing for all of us is bad behaviour and terrible operating practices - now if somebody could sort this one, it would be great. The Governments do need to invest time in policing the ham bands. I just don't think the budget will ever materialise - until then - ham radio is what it is!

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